From one beginner to another

I have collected numerous resources over the years. I have include just a few below.
I feel you can over do the amount of magazines, books and tutorials you collect. However what all these elements bring to your life is inspiration to carry on producing better quality work. Even if you just look at a great piece of art once and never look at it again. Reading about the latest software also inspires me to want to give it a go.

The resources below may not float everyones boat, but I swear by the ones I have actually managed to open and digest.
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In 2006 I walked into a news agents and spotted ImagineFX. I was blown away by the content and promptly subscribed.
This magazine provides hints news and wonderful examples of artwork to inspire every budding artist. It is aimed more at the artist rather than 3D. However on closer inspection you'll find that some of the breath taking work utilises 3D software as well as 2D software.
Throughout the magazine you will find a section where you can send in your own work and hope it gets printed. A section where professionals will show some of their secrets. A section where the professionals will answer your creative questions. Reviews and much much more.
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I have recently started purchasing 3DArtist via an app on my ipad. It knocks a couple of quid off the paper version, but you don't get the DVD.
This magazine gives me more of an insight into the World of 3D. Yet again the pages are full of breath taking work, which I find extremely inspiring.
It's nice to be able to read about the latest techniques that artists are taking advantage of. The software reviews are of particular interest to me.
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There are a handful of books out there that try and teach ZBrush. However my advice is to choose wisely. Read any reviews you can find before you purchase. The two books shown here deliver tutorials in an easy to follow and concise manner. I felt I had spent my money wisely.
Scott Spencer is a talented artist and I became a big fan after flicking through his first book 'ZBrush Character Creation', which taught me an awful lot about ZBrush. I was so impressed with his style of teaching I went out and bought 'ZBrush Digital Sculpting'. I've yet to complete the second book, which is aimed more at anatomy, so I will be picking it up soon.
Both books are accompanied by a DVD, full of extra resources, including video tutorials.
I have since purchased 'Introducing ZBrush 4' by Eric Keller, in Kindle format for my iPad, which is excellent. I even managed to get the DVD by contacting the publisher.
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Even though Poser is one of the easiest apps to learn I still needed some literature to guide me. 'Practical Poser 7' did the job.
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These are two books I can't wait to get my teeth into. I spent some time checking out reviews. Let's just hope I made the right choice.
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The collection of d'artiste books are beautifully presented. They are full of some of the best digital art work and inspiration oozes from the pages. I just wish I could afford the complete collection and have the time to read them page by page.

My collection include:
Character Modelling
Character Modelling 2
Character Modelling 3
Matte Painting

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Reference books are important to study how others work and which tools they use. A mixture of traditional art and digital art helps to open your mind. 'Digital Art Masters' vol 4 by Focal Press is a particular favourite of mine.
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Anatomy is something I've always struggled with. Mind you I never did study life drawing, so I thought I'd buy a couple of books to help me understand anatomy a little better.
'Anatomy for the Artist' by Sarah Simblet is especially cool as it contains top class photographs of well chosen models. It also includes illustrations of muscles and bones on simulator paper, which overlays the photographs.
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The first Screenwriting book I purchased was The 'Screenwriter's Bible'. It taught me everything and I always refer back to it. That's why it's call a bible.
'How to Write a Selling Screenplay' was a really interesting read and I plan to have another read soon.
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There are many web sites I find useful. Probably too many to list here. But here are a few of my favourites:
http://www.zbrushcentral.com - Brilliant Forums, which include projects posted by professional and amateur artists. As well as advice on using ZBrush.
http://www.zbrushworkshops.com - The best ZBrush learning experience I have been involved in, developed and run by Ryan Kingslien.
http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com - Great online tutorials.
http://cg.tutsplus.com - A bucket full of ZBrush tutorials.
http://www.veoh.com - More ZBrush tutorials.
http://poser.smithmicro.com - Poser tutorials.
http://www.renderosity.com - Great for loads of 3D stuff.
http://www.cornucopia3d.com - Market place for Vue models..
http://www.triggerstreet.com - A great place to share your screenplays and have them reviewed. You do need to give a little though, by reviewing other screenplays. This is a great way to learn more about writing.
http://www.inktip.com - I just became a member, but this is a great place to get your Screenplay noticed, if it's good enough.
http://www.istockphoto.com - For reference.
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I originally turned to my beloved books for help in using the tools in my toolbox. However I soon found that I could increase the speed of my learning process by using video tutorials. It's like looking over the shoulder of a professional.

Most of my video tutorial library consist of ZBrush tutorials. The last tutorial I viewed was '3D Character Design Volume1' and 'Volume2' by Scott Patton, which answered a lot of my questions. This is probably my favourite of the lot and Scott is a great teacher.
What I found difficult regarding video tutorials was selecting one that included the content I needed to coincide with my workflow. I couldn't afford to take a chance. But I have to admit most of the DVD's have given me what I wanted even if some of them was a ten minute section.

I found that Gnomon and Digital Tutors provided the tutorials I was after, plus they are big names in tutorial DVD's.

There are a wide selection of tutorials out there. I started with the free stuff, which you can find in the web sector above.

A few from my collection:
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thegnomonworkshop:
Introduction to ZBrush
ZBrush Production Pipeline
Head Sculpting & Texturing
Digital Sculpting: Human Anatomy
3D Character Design Volume 1 & 2
Digital Tutors:
Materials and Rendering in ZBrush
ZSphere Modelling in ZBrush
Texturing Next-Gen Character in ZB
Detailing Next-Gen Character in ZB
Character Creation in ZBrush